High-frequency trading

Espaço dedicado a todo o tipo de troca de impressões sobre os mercados financeiros de uma forma genérica e a todo o tipo de informação útil que possa condicionar o desempenho dos mesmos

Moderadores: pata-hari, Ulisses Pereira, MarcoAntonio

High-frequency trading

por alexpto » 24/7/2009 13:11

Traders Profit With Computers Set at High Speed


It is the hot new thing on Wall Street, a way for a handful of traders to master the stock market, peek at investors’ orders and, critics say, even subtly manipulate share prices.

It is called high-frequency trading — and it is suddenly one of the most talked-about and mysterious forces in the markets.

Powerful computers, some housed right next to the machines that drive marketplaces like the New York Stock Exchange, enable high-frequency traders to transmit millions of orders at lightning speed and, their detractors contend, reap billions at everyone else’s expense.

These systems are so fast they can outsmart or outrun other investors, humans and computers alike. And after growing in the shadows for years, they are generating lots of talk.

Nearly everyone on Wall Street is wondering how hedge funds and large banks like Goldman Sachs are making so much money so soon after the financial system nearly collapsed. High-frequency trading is one answer.

And when a former Goldman Sachs programmer was accused this month of stealing secret computer codes — software that a federal prosecutor said could “manipulate markets in unfair ways” — it only added to the mystery. Goldman acknowledges that it profits from high-frequency trading, but disputes that it has an unfair advantage.

Yet high-frequency specialists clearly have an edge over typical traders, let alone ordinary investors. The Securities and Exchange Commission says it is examining certain aspects of the strategy.

“This is where all the money is getting made,” said William H. Donaldson, former chairman and chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange and today an adviser to a big hedge fund. “If an individual investor doesn’t have the means to keep up, they’re at a huge disadvantage.”

For most of Wall Street’s history, stock trading was fairly straightforward: buyers and sellers gathered on exchange floors and dickered until they struck a deal. Then, in 1998, the Securities and Exchange Commission authorized electronic exchanges to compete with marketplaces like the New York Stock Exchange. The intent was to open markets to anyone with a desktop computer and a fresh idea.

But as new marketplaces have emerged, PCs have been unable to compete with Wall Street’s computers. Powerful algorithms — “algos,” in industry parlance — execute millions of orders a second and scan dozens of public and private marketplaces simultaneously. They can spot trends before other investors can blink, changing orders and strategies within milliseconds.

High-frequency traders often confound other investors by issuing and then canceling orders almost simultaneously. Loopholes in market rules give high-speed investors an early glance at how others are trading. And their computers can essentially bully slower investors into giving up profits — and then disappear before anyone even knows they were there.

High-frequency traders also benefit from competition among the various exchanges, which pay small fees that are often collected by the biggest and most active traders — typically a quarter of a cent per share to whoever arrives first. Those small payments, spread over millions of shares, help high-speed investors profit simply by trading enormous numbers of shares, even if they buy or sell at a modest loss.

“It’s become a technological arms race, and what separates winners and losers is how fast they can move,” said Joseph M. Mecane of NYSE Euronext, which operates the New York Stock Exchange. “Markets need liquidity, and high-frequency traders provide opportunities for other investors to buy and sell.”

The rise of high-frequency trading helps explain why activity on the nation’s stock exchanges has exploded. Average daily volume has soared by 164 percent since 2005, according to data from NYSE. Although precise figures are elusive, stock exchanges say that a handful of high-frequency traders now account for a more than half of all trades. To understand this high-speed world, consider what happened when slow-moving traders went up against high-frequency robots earlier this month, and ended up handing spoils to lightning-fast computers.

It was July 15, and Intel, the computer chip giant, had reporting robust earnings the night before. Some investors, smelling opportunity, set out to buy shares in the semiconductor company Broadcom. (Their activities were described by an investor at a major Wall Street firm who spoke on the condition of anonymity to protect his job.) The slower traders faced a quandary: If they sought to buy a large number of shares at once, they would tip their hand and risk driving up Broadcom’s price. So, as is often the case on Wall Street, they divided their orders into dozens of small batches, hoping to cover their tracks. One second after the market opened, shares of Broadcom started changing hands at $26.20.

The slower traders began issuing buy orders. But rather than being shown to all potential sellers at the same time, some of those orders were most likely routed to a collection of high-frequency traders for just 30 milliseconds — 0.03 seconds — in what are known as flash orders. While markets are supposed to ensure transparency by showing orders to everyone simultaneously, a loophole in regulations allows marketplaces like Nasdaq to show traders some orders ahead of everyone else in exchange for a fee.

In less than half a second, high-frequency traders gained a valuable insight: the hunger for Broadcom was growing. Their computers began buying up Broadcom shares and then reselling them to the slower investors at higher prices. The overall price of Broadcom began to rise.

Soon, thousands of orders began flooding the markets as high-frequency software went into high gear. Automatic programs began issuing and canceling tiny orders within milliseconds to determine how much the slower traders were willing to pay. The high-frequency computers quickly determined that some investors’ upper limit was $26.40. The price shot to $26.39, and high-frequency programs began offering to sell hundreds of thousands of shares.

The result is that the slower-moving investors paid $1.4 million for about 56,000 shares, or $7,800 more than if they had been able to move as quickly as the high-frequency traders.

Multiply such trades across thousands of stocks a day, and the profits are substantial. High-frequency traders generated about $21 billion in profits last year, the Tabb Group, a research firm, estimates.

“You want to encourage innovation, and you want to reward companies that have invested in technology and ideas that make the markets more efficient,” said Andrew M. Brooks, head of United States equity trading at T. Rowe Price, a mutual fund and investment company that often competes with and uses high-frequency techniques. “But we’re moving toward a two-tiered marketplace of the high-frequency arbitrage guys, and everyone else. People want to know they have a legitimate shot at getting a fair deal. Otherwise, the markets lose their integrity.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/24/busin ... f=business
 
Mensagens: 56
Registado: 28/2/2009 22:36
Localização: 12

por Jim Beam » 24/7/2009 14:14

Parece-me que era disso que o nosso PSI20 precisava, para ver se aumentava a liquidez.... :lol:

Isto no Verão é cá uma pasmaceira...
:roll:
"Live and learn!! Life's a lesson!!", DMX
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 473
Registado: 20/7/2004 20:24
Localização: 1

por jrtrader1 » 24/7/2009 17:26

Penso que quem observa diariamente os movimentos efectuados ao minuto, apercebe-se que, ao contrário do que muitos tentam transmitir, há claramente manipulação das cotações, seja essa efectuada por grandes traders ou institucionais, mas a realidade é que existe e por vezes é mesmo óbvio...

Actualmente já muito li sobre este tema e sobre grandes computadores ocupando prédios inteiros cuja única função é descobrir tendências, métodos utilizados por trades particulares e aproveitá-las.

Parece-me que, ao contrário do que muitos pensam, o investidor particular está cada vez mais em desvantagem e cada vez se torna mais perigoso para nós.

Apenas o meu pensamento sobre o assunto.
Bolsa e Mercados Financeiros: http://jr-trader.blogspot.com/
 
Mensagens: 66
Registado: 29/11/2007 2:37
Localização: Sandim

por alexpto » 24/7/2009 17:37

Fiquei ainda mais admirado com esta parte:
While markets are supposed to ensure transparency by showing orders to everyone simultaneously, a loophole in regulations allows marketplaces like Nasdaq to show traders some orders ahead of everyone else in exchange for a fee


Cada vez mais isto é para quem pode e não para quem quer.
 
Mensagens: 56
Registado: 28/2/2009 22:36
Localização: 12

por LTCM » 24/7/2009 18:51

alexpto Escreveu:Fiquei ainda mais admirado com esta parte:
While markets are supposed to ensure transparency by showing orders to everyone simultaneously, a loophole in regulations allows marketplaces like Nasdaq to show traders some orders ahead of everyone else in exchange for a fee


Cada vez mais isto é para quem pode e não para quem quer.

Goldman Sachs as one of the mega firms that uses this method of out trading the masses, they were even accused this month of stealing secret computer codes that a federal prosecutor said could manipulate markets in unfair ways.

GS and others admit to high-frequency trading, and why shouldn't they? It is legal, and a spectacular way to rake it in if you have the money and means.
Remember the Golden Rule: Those who have the gold make the rules.
***
"A soberania e o respeito de Portugal impõem que neste lugar se erga um Forte, e isso é obra e serviço dos homens de El-Rei nosso senhor e, como tal, por mais duro, por mais difícil e por mais trabalhoso que isso dê, (...) é serviço de Portugal. E tem que se cumprir."
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 2982
Registado: 28/2/2007 14:18

por MarcoAntonio » 8/8/2009 18:43

JRTRADER Escreveu:Parece-me que, ao contrário do que muitos pensam, o investidor particular está cada vez mais em desvantagem e cada vez se torna mais perigoso para nós.


O pequeno investidor particular deve-se focar no médio/longo-prazo. É o que defendo há muitos anos...

Claro que a cada um cabe a decisão de investir da forma que entender e aplicar a estratégia que lhe parecer melhor. Mas o pequeno trader/investidor normalmente não dispõe das condições adequadas para o daytrading e outras formas de trading agressivo. Digo-o há anos.

E não se trata de manipulação porque o mercado é isto e creio que é isso que custa assimilar: o mercado é um meio competitivo, sempre foi!

Cada um luta com as armas que tem e não faz sentido ser de outra forma. Claro que também faz sentido regular, limitar práticas, etc mas este tipo de questão levantar-se-á sempre e existirá sempre e não é por isso que A ou B não tem condições para bater o mercado. Pode é não ter condições para bater o mercado de determinada forma.

E porque é que eu digo que o pequeno investidor deve focar-se no médio/longo-prazo?

Porque este não tem força para influenciar o mercado nem movê-lo e, geralmente, nem sequer tem grandes condições em termos de custos de trading. Portanto, deve ir "na onda", seguir a "tendência", apostar em prazos onde este tipo de movimento e influência que se descreve aqui passa para segundo plano e torna-se pouco importante.

De que forma é que estas empresas vão tirar partido por exemplo de um investidor que compra acções, tentando apanhar um Bull Market e vende passado um dois anos ou até mais?

Não pode!

A única forma era fazer "desaparecer o Bull Market" e transformá-lo num Bear Market o que para mim está para lá das capacidades de qualquer tubarão. A prazo acabaria engolido porque ninguém consegue manipular o mercado todo nessa dimensão, há demasiados factores envolvidos e eles próprios concorrem com outros tubarões.

E o facto é que longos períodos de Bull e Bear Market continuam a suceder-se, sendo indentificáveis, havendo tempo para entrar e retirar rendibilidade deles...

Ora, uma estratégia conservadora já permite obter rendibilidades consistentes no muito longo-prazo que representem uma valorização do capital bem acima da economia.


Claro que isto será um pouco mais difícil de aplicar para quem pretender viver exclusivamente do trading. Mas aí voltamos à questão: trata-se de um peixinho a querer viver numa água infestada de tubarões e vai passar o tempo a dizer "manipulação aqui", "manipulação acolá".

Enquanto o trader mais conservador vai ver tudo isto passar, ano após ano e não lhe dar grande relevância (num ano é "naked shortselling", no outro são as "flash orders" e assim se vai saltando de uns anos para os outros de "manipulação em manipulação").

E como disse mais atrás, vai ser sempre assim (e é tem sido mais ou menos assim desde que acompanho os mercados desde finais dos anos 90).




Para aí há uns 5 anos que não olho para um COF. E não tenho saudades nenhumas nem sinto a mínima falta de olhar...
Bons Negócios,
Marco Antonio
Caldeirão de Bolsa

FLOP - Fundamental Laws Of Profit


1. Mais vale perder um ganho que ganhar uma perda, a menos que se cumpra a Segunda Lei.
2. A expectativa de ganho deve superar a expectativa de perda, onde a expectativa mede a
....amplitude média do ganho/perda contra a respectiva probabilidade.
3. A Primeira Lei não é mesmo necessária mas com Três Leis isto fica definitivamente mais giro.
Avatar do Utilizador
Administrador Fórum
 
Mensagens: 31693
Registado: 4/11/2002 22:16
Localização: Vilar do Paraíso

por Dwer » 8/8/2009 19:50

LTCM Escreveu:Goldman Sachs as one of the mega firms that uses this method of out trading the masses, they were even accused this month of stealing secret computer codes that a federal prosecutor said could manipulate markets in unfair ways.


Esta citação está toda ao contrário.
A GS queixou-se de lhe terem roubado código. E acrescentou que esse código poderia ser usado para manipular o mercado.
Abraço,
Dwer

There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 3414
Registado: 4/11/2002 23:16

por Fenicio » 8/8/2009 20:43

Um tema realmente muito interessante.

De modo geral concordo com a opinião do MarcoAntonio. Mesmo que não exista um tal sistema capaz de manipular as transacções no curto-prazo, é um facto que as grandes casas financeiras utilizam sistemas super-avançados capazes de apanharem as tendências ao segundo e, com isso, fisgarem oportunidades que nós, meros pequenos investidores, nunca conseguiríamos.

Mas daí a manipularem ostensivamente as cotações eu acho que é um certo exagero.
"Es gibt keine verzweifelten Lagen, es gibt nur verzweifelte Menschen" - Heinz Guderian

Trad. "Não existem situações desesperadas, apenas pessoas desesperadas"

Cartago Technical Analysis - Blog
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 3056
Registado: 20/1/2008 20:32
Localização: Lisboa

por Adrox » 8/8/2009 22:32

JRTRADER Escreveu:Penso que quem observa diariamente os movimentos efectuados ao minuto, apercebe-se que, ao contrário do que muitos tentam transmitir, há claramente manipulação das cotações, seja essa efectuada por grandes traders ou institucionais, mas a realidade é que existe e por vezes é mesmo óbvio...

Se as manipulações são assim tao faceis de descobrir e de identificar para ti, presumo que também seja muito facil para ti acompanhar as manipulações e ganhar montes de dinheiro, não??

Ou é mais ao contrário, sempre que perdes dinheiro é pk da manipulação??


Acredita que se eu visse manipulações todos os dias, mantinha-me bem caladinho, e limitava-me a segui-las e a ganhar dinheiro...


Cumprimentos.[/b]
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 379
Registado: 29/11/2007 1:43
Localização: Lisboa

por jrtrader1 » 9/8/2009 12:57

Se as manipulações são assim tao faceis de descobrir e de identificar para ti, presumo que também seja muito facil para ti acompanhar as manipulações e ganhar montes de dinheiro, não??


Adrox, eu nunca disse que as manipulações eram fáceis de descobrir para mim, e muito menos que eram fáceis de decifrar antes de ocorrerem (a ser fácil de descobrir terá de ser necessariamente apenas por quem as faz), simplesmente gostaria de me explicassem porque é que, pelo menos nos prazos mais curtos, a maioria do "breaks" antes de ocorrerem têm fortíssimos movimentos em sentido contrário, numa tentativa de ludibriar as massas (não serão certamente as massas a provocarem-nos!) se isso não é manipulação, não sei o que será!

De qualquer forma, nem sei o porquê da tua mensagem, nem percebo porque é que a maioria das pessoas não aceita que se fale desse tema, das manipulações. Provavelmente preferem acreditar que não existem.

Ainda no outro dia, um investidor americano dizia que o seu broker lhe tinha dito o seguinte (vou tentar traduzir parte): "que os Head and shoulders já não funcionavam mais porque os programas que alguns bancos possuíam (like GS) conseguem "fix the pattern to catch you and take your money."
Estes programas têm tanto poder e dinheiro...eles podem brincar com os preços e criar os padrões...para nos apanhar..."
É óbvio que não posso garantir a veracidade deste conteúdo, mas limito-me a ler muito sobre o assunto e mantenho a minha mente aberta.

De certeza que todos já ouvimos falar de manipulações e muitas delas já mais que provadas (nem precisamos de ir muito longe, basta ver o que aconteceu com o BCP), não percebo porque é que continua a ser um tema "tabu" e porque é que aparecem logo estes comentários a insinuar que só quando se perde dinheiro é que achamos que há manipulação.

Eu sempre achei que havia manipulação nos mercados, de uma forma ou de outra (talvez seja mais difícil de acontecer no longo prazo como diz o Marco, talvez), isso não quer dizer que é devido a isso que se perde ou que não se pode ganhar nos mercados, simplesmente existe e é uma componente a ter em conta por quem investe.
Bolsa e Mercados Financeiros: http://jr-trader.blogspot.com/
 
Mensagens: 66
Registado: 29/11/2007 2:37
Localização: Sandim

por cannot » 9/8/2009 14:46

Soon, thousands of orders began flooding the markets as high-frequency software went into high gear. Automatic programs began issuing and canceling tiny orders within milliseconds to determine how much the slower traders were willing to pay. The high-frequency computers quickly determined that some investors’ upper limit was $26.40. The price shot to $26.39, and high-frequency programs began offering to sell hundreds of thousands of shares.


Boas! Não sei se leram isto com atenção mas para mim, chamem-lhe o que quiserem, isto é concorrência desleal. Concordo que no longo prazo pouca importância isto terá mas porque será que temos que pagar mais porque alguém consegue determinar com (bastante) exactidão o que os outros estão dispostos a pagar?

Notem que as ordens são dadas e canceladas, e têm apenas o objectivo de determinar o quanto os outros estão dispostos a pagar, "levando" (imediatamente) o preço para esse patamar. Não pretendem apanhar tendência nenhuma, apenas determinar onde começará a tendência. Bem sei que lhe podem chamar concorrência e uso da tecnologia, e que o mercado é assim mesmo, mas aqui existe uma questão importante que é a ética. E não me digam que isso não pode existir no mercado.

Digam o que quiserem, é ilegal manipular os preços das acções (para proveito próprio). O que acontece nestes casos é exactamente isso. Tal como "ataques" intencionais (e combinados) a determinadas empresas usando "naked short selling" é ilegal. Difícil de provar mas ilegal.

Não sei qual a solução, pois tudo isto é difícil de regular. Ao mesmo tempo não se pode simplesmente impor demasiadas regras ou proibições pois estaríamos a ir contra a ideia de "mercado livre". Concordo com o Marco quando apresenta soluções para os "mais pequeninos" mas não acho que se deva ignorar estes "problemas" no sistema.


É por estas e por outras que transacciono principalmente no OTC, onde existe menos liquidez e muito menos influência destes factores. Pela minha (pouquíssima) experiência "sinto" que os padrões (sinais de compra) neste mercado são bastante mais fiáveis.

Abraço

ps - também é por estas e por outras que penso que os sistemas de trading automáticos têm imensas vantagens sobre os outros, uma grande lista de vantagens mesmo. Por isso estou a construir (lentamente) o meu. Mas, como disse acima, acho importante que tenhamos alguma ética.
"Every solution breeds new problems." Murphy's Law
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 1279
Registado: 15/1/2009 15:28
Localização: Earth

por MarcoAntonio » 9/8/2009 17:13

cannot Escreveu:Não sei qual a solução, pois tudo isto é difícil de regular. Ao mesmo tempo não se pode simplesmente impor demasiadas regras ou proibições pois estaríamos a ir contra a ideia de "mercado livre". Concordo com o Marco quando apresenta soluções para os "mais pequeninos" mas não acho que se deva ignorar estes "problemas" no sistema.


Eu queria sublinhar que não sugeri que se deveria ignorar a existência de problemas no sistema (antes pelo contrário) mas, tal como dizes, o que apresento é a solução prática para o pequeno investidor de como evitar que este tipo de situação se torne um problema para si.

Por exemplo, em relação no "naked short-selling" eu disse sempre que era contra...


cannot Escreveu:também é por estas e por outras que penso que os sistemas de trading automáticos têm imensas vantagens sobre os outros, uma grande lista de vantagens mesmo. Por isso estou a construir (lentamente) o meu.


Cannot, os sistemas mecânicos tendem a comportar-se de forma... mais mecanizada e logo mais previsível. Pela ordem de ideias que aqui estás a apresentar, o que tu deverias fazer era "fugir" de desenvolver um sistema mecânico pois corres o risco de desenvolver um sistema que "funcionava no passado" mas, uma vez que o colocas a funcionar, vai estar sujeito ao escrutínio de sistemas mais avançados e pode ser usado contra ti. Voltamos ao mesmo, estarás a lutar com armas desiguais: vais com o teu computador lutar contra salas inteiras de computadores que passam o tempo a tentar perceber o que é que os "pequenos computadores" andam a fazer no mercado.
Bons Negócios,
Marco Antonio
Caldeirão de Bolsa

FLOP - Fundamental Laws Of Profit


1. Mais vale perder um ganho que ganhar uma perda, a menos que se cumpra a Segunda Lei.
2. A expectativa de ganho deve superar a expectativa de perda, onde a expectativa mede a
....amplitude média do ganho/perda contra a respectiva probabilidade.
3. A Primeira Lei não é mesmo necessária mas com Três Leis isto fica definitivamente mais giro.
Avatar do Utilizador
Administrador Fórum
 
Mensagens: 31693
Registado: 4/11/2002 22:16
Localização: Vilar do Paraíso

por alexpto » 9/8/2009 18:51

Não querendo fugir muito ao tópico, tenho andado a ler sobre os programas de trading automático, e a verdade é que no forex existem brokers a indicar que clientes com estes programas "não são bem vindos", sobretudo com o scalp trading, mas a verdade é que eles não gostam porque os programas negoceiam online a partir do pc do cliente, ou seja, habitualmente o broker (sobretudo os desk trading brokers) servem-se das ordens colocadas e dos stops colocados para prever o mercado e fazer os seus investimentos, como estes programas decidem online, e alguns inclusivamente colocam stops falsos que depois eliminam ou executam mais cedo, acabam por "estragar a vida" aos market makers.

Isto tudo para dizer, que os pequenos também tem as suas cartas para jogar!

Bons negócios
 
Mensagens: 56
Registado: 28/2/2009 22:36
Localização: 12

por arnie » 9/8/2009 20:16

O termo 'manipulação' cria sempre enorme celeuma.


Eu penso que qualquer tipo de negocio feito por dois intervenientes tem que obrigatoriamente sofrer qualquer tipo de manipulação.

Tendo um comprador como objectivo comprar o mais barato possivel e o vendedor vender o mais caro possivel, ambos irão obrigatoriamente tentar levar a sua ideia avante, tentando sempre um dos lados "enganar" o outro.

Reparem que eu usei o termo 'enganar' entre aspas pois existe o 'enganar' dentro da lei, necessário para que a lei da oferta e da procura funcione e o 'enganar' fora da lei, onde existe uma clara preversão dessa mesma lei.

Como exemplo de manipulação "fora da lei" podemos usar a que foi recentemente descoberta e que assistimos aquando da descoberta do subprime.
Esta sim, esta é aquela manipulação na qual nada podemos fazer visto nunca termos conhecimento da mesma a não ser mesmo na altura dos pagamentos serem feitos.

Agora toda aquela 'manipulação' onde se diz que os grandes brokers/casas de investimento possuem sistemas de trading e afins que os colocam em vantagem no que diz respeito aos pequenos traders, sinceramente não vejo qual o grande problema.

Tal como disse o Marco, aqui o pequeno trader tem todo o controlo da situação. É sabido que as grandes casas de investimento possuem "ferramentas" às quais o pequeno trader jamais terá acesso, logo, quando ele se mete no meio do mercado a fazer daytrading ele tem a perfeita noção onde se está a meter.

O pequeno trader tem total liberdade de decidir se faz daytrade ou não. Ninguém o obriga a abrir posições para tentar apanhar 2 ou 3 pontos no S&P ou 5 ou 10 pips no EURUSD.

Se fazem daytrade e depois perdem dinheiro não culpem os manipuladores, culpem-se vocês mesmos pois sabiam de antemão onde se estavam a meter. E se não souberem então desculpem lá dizer isto mas é bem feita terem perdido pois deveriam ter estudado a lição antes de se terem metido lá.

Os especuladores fazem falta no mercado, para o bem e para o mal.

Sistemas mecanicos para daytrade penso serem um autêntico suicidio. Sim, temos que ter um sistema com regras fixas mas no daytrade há que ter alguma latitude. Não temos capacidades de lutar com os sistemas das grandes casas de investimento que recebem cotações sem qualquer tipo de delay (os pequenos traders por norma recebem essas mesmas cotações com 1 ou 2 seg de delay) e têm acesso as todas as ordens dos seus clientes.

Não, não vejo nenhum problema em ter um delay de 1 seg nas cotações pois não tenho qualquer tipo de interesse em competir com as grandes casas de investimento onde têm "assento" na bolsa e onde muitas vezes não pagam qualquer tipo de comissão sobre os negocios que fazem.
No entanto pagam autenticas fortunas para terem esse "assento".
A ultima vez que ouvi falar no assunto, um "assento" na NYSE já ia nos 4 milhões de dolares.

Escolham o time frame para negociarem correcto com o vosso temperamento. Tomem consciência que a manipulação existe e que faz falta para um correcto funcionamento do mercado.

Aprendam a ser responsaveis por vocês mesmos e parem de culpar os outros pelos vossos erros.
Bons negocios,
arnie
 
Mensagens: 3094
Registado: 4/11/2002 23:09
Localização: Viras à esq, segues em frente, viras à dir, segues em frente e viras novamente à dir. CHEGASTE

por alexpto » 9/8/2009 20:43

Concordo plenamente contigo Arnie, mas é errado as entidades oficiais não manterem uma postura que vá de encontro a um "fair market", nomeadamente na questão de darem informação antecipada das cofs a quem pagar para isso.

Porque se a moda pega, qualquer dia na formula 1, deixam arrancar uns segundos mais cedo quem pagar mais :lol: (just kidding)

É sempre um prazer ler os teus posts.

Bons negócios
 
Mensagens: 56
Registado: 28/2/2009 22:36
Localização: 12

por corvo47 » 9/8/2009 22:30

arnie Escreveu:
Escolham o time frame para negociarem correcto com o vosso temperamento. Tomem consciência que a manipulação existe e que faz falta para um correcto funcionamento do mercado.

Aprendam a ser responsaveis por vocês mesmos e parem de culpar os outros pelos vossos erros.


Estas duas frases são meio caminho para o sucesso. Tanto na bolsa como na vida.

Um abraço.
Nunca te é dado um desejo sem também te ser dado o poder de o realizares.Contudo,poderás ter de lutar por isso. Richard Bach "in" Ilusões.
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 710
Registado: 14/3/2008 22:39
Localização: Terra Media

por cannot » 9/8/2009 23:01

Bem! Tanta coisa para responder. Vou tentar ser sucinto e deixar clara a minha opinião, que em alguns pontos é diferente das expostas aqui (por pessoal que é muito mais experiente que eu portanto leiam-me com uma pitada de sal).

Arnie Escreveu:Agora toda aquela 'manipulação' onde se diz que os grandes brokers/casas de investimento possuem sistemas de trading e afins que os colocam em vantagem no que diz respeito aos pequenos traders, sinceramente não vejo qual o grande problema.

Isto é uma opinião que eu partilho até ao ponto em que essa desvantagem aparece por uma questão de má ética. Reparem, o mercado é exactamente possível pois alguém está disposto a vender algo a um preço que outro se dispõe a pagar. O importante aqui é que ninguém sabe (exactamente) quanto o outro está disposto a pagar, o que torna isto negociável. Na bolsa deveria existir uma fase em que se tenta fazer um "matching" entre vendedor comprador, tudo bem até aqui. Quando alguém tem sistemas que podem (artificialmente - porque usam ordens que não pretendem à partida deixar ser executadas e servem exclusivamente para varrer os valores até encontrar o local óptimo para começar a colocar as ordens reais) "perceber" o que os outros estão dispostos a pagar, subverte um pouco o sistema.

Eu não tenho ainda opinião completamente formada sobre isto mas acho que devemos pelo menos pensar bem se achamos isto correcto ou não.


MarcoAntonio Escreveu:
cannot Escreveu:Não sei qual a solução, pois tudo isto é difícil de regular. Ao mesmo tempo não se pode simplesmente impor demasiadas regras ou proibições pois estaríamos a ir contra a ideia de "mercado livre". Concordo com o Marco quando apresenta soluções para os "mais pequeninos" mas não acho que se deva ignorar estes "problemas" no sistema.


Eu queria sublinhar que não sugeri que se deveria ignorar a existência de problemas no sistema (antes pelo contrário) mas, tal como dizes, o que apresento é a solução prática para o pequeno investidor de como evitar que este tipo de situação se torne um problema para si.

Por exemplo, em relação no "naked short-selling" eu disse sempre que era contra...

Certo, eu conheço a tua opinião (do que tenho lido dos teus posts) e não quis passar essa ideia. Concordo plenamente.


MarcoAntonio Escreveu:
cannot Escreveu:também é por estas e por outras que penso que os sistemas de trading automáticos têm imensas vantagens sobre os outros, uma grande lista de vantagens mesmo. Por isso estou a construir (lentamente) o meu.


Cannot, os sistemas mecânicos tendem a comportar-se de forma... mais mecanizada e logo mais previsível. Pela ordem de ideias que aqui estás a apresentar, o que tu deverias fazer era "fugir" de desenvolver um sistema mecânico pois corres o risco de desenvolver um sistema que "funcionava no passado" mas, uma vez que o colocas a funcionar, vai estar sujeito ao escrutínio de sistemas mais avançados e pode ser usado contra ti. Voltamos ao mesmo, estarás a lutar com armas desiguais: vais com o teu computador lutar contra salas inteiras de computadores que passam o tempo a tentar perceber o que é que os "pequenos computadores" andam a fazer no mercado.

Aqui tenho que discordar totalmente. Um sistema automático é mecânico no sentido em que é "comandado" por uma máquina mas isso não implica que seja mecanizado, pelo menos no sentido de ser previsível.

Não sei até que ponto conheces os sistemas automáticos (eu uso a palavra automático por isso mesmo, não é simplesmente mecânico mas também julgo que não se poderá considerar inteligente, mas é automático, no sentido de que não necessita de ser operado por um humano), mas hoje em dia pode-se fazer coisas muito interessantes. Eu trabalho nesta área, desenvolvo sistemas automáticos (ou autónomos) que fazem classificação, ou previsão e vão "aprendendo" com o tempo, na área da robótica e em ambientes não controlados (portanto eu não sei como se vai comportar o meio envolvente nem o que pode decorrer das minhas acções).

Não vale a pena estar a entrar em pormenores, mas pensa em algo que está dotado de um objectivo (ex: ganhar dinheiro na bolsa) e de um método para obter esse objectivo (ex: um qqr método matemático de optimização que consiga aprender a detectar alturas mais prováveis para isso acontecer), e tens o teu sistema automático (claro que muito mais está envolvido ao desenvolver estes sistemas).

Acredita que um sistema destes é tudo menos previsível. Se vou usar para fazer day trading ou trend detection ou qqr outra maneira de ganhar dinheiro em bolsa ainda não sei, mas (em princípio) poderia usar em qqr um dos casos.

O que dizes dos sistemas serem mais avançados é um falácia também. Tal como o meu os outros sistemas têm um "objectivo" e é aqui (em conjunto com as características que insiro no sistemas - tipo cotação, volume, cofs, indicadores, etc...) que reside a "arte" em desenvolver estas coisas. Posso eu tirar partido disso também, isto é sempre um pau de dois bicos. Não é somente pelo poder computacional que os outros ganham vantagem, mas se for esse o caso terei que aumentar o meu horizonte temporal. Certamente não conseguirei dar ordens instantâneas, mas se calhar também não preciso de o fazer para que o sistema funcione (pode muito bem fazer só uma ordem por dia, e posso usar isto para procurar acção que estejam numa situação favorável ao final do dia - porquê fazer só trading num activo?).


Arnie Escreveu:Sistemas mecanicos para daytrade penso serem um autêntico suicidio. Sim, temos que ter um sistema com regras fixas mas no daytrade há que ter alguma latitude. Não temos capacidades de lutar com os sistemas das grandes casas de investimento que recebem cotações sem qualquer tipo de delay (os pequenos traders por norma recebem essas mesmas cotações com 1 ou 2 seg de delay) e têm acesso as todas as ordens dos seus clientes.

Grande parte já respondi antes mas o que dizes do delay é importante e claro há que ter isso em conta no nosso sistema - como disse não é necessário fazer trading ao segundo pode ser ao minuto, ou ao dia, ou uma vez por semana. Isto não interessa muito.

A parte das regras fixas também já respondi, mas volto a frisar - o tipo de sistemas que falo tem tudo menos regras fixas.


Pela minha experiência neste tipo de sistemas (já são 4/5 anos, mas a minha experiência na bolsa é muito pouco ainda) estou perfeitamente convencido que, especificamente na bolsa, um sistema automático pode fazer muito melhor do que a maior parte dos traders, mesmo do que os mais experientes (estou a falar de sistemas que de aprendizagem que são o que de melhor se faz hoje em dia nesta área - houve uma grande evolução nos últimos 10 anos). Existem outras tarefas em que é muito difícil que as máquinas façam melhor do que nós pois já temos milénios de experiência (são coisas naturais para os humanos) com lidar com outras pessoas (este não é certamente o caso da bolsa - fazer trading na bolsa não é nada natural para um humano daí ser necessário tanto tempo para aprender e ser minimamente consistente).


Abraço
"Every solution breeds new problems." Murphy's Law
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 1279
Registado: 15/1/2009 15:28
Localização: Earth

por MarcoAntonio » 9/8/2009 23:16

cannot Escreveu:Não sei até que ponto conheces os sistemas automáticos (...)


Estou relativamente familiarizado e sei que existe uma grande variedade de sistemas, incluindo sistemas desenvolvidos para se comportarem autonomamente em meios caóticos, algoritmos genéticos, redes neuronais e toda essa coisa (do que até já tenho umas luzes deste os tempos da faculdade, na cadeira de Inteligência Artificial). Nada disso é propriamente novo (aliás, uma das minhas colegas fez na altura um mestrado neste área, ainda eu ligava muito pouco aos mercados, por mera curiosidade).

Mas é claro que quando dizes que estás a desenvolver um sistema, eu não faço idéia de que tipo de sistema estás a falar e falei de uma forma genérica.

A maior parte dos sistemas que os traders desenvolvem são na verdade coisas bastante "elementares" e pouco "sofisticadas", apesar de poderem gastar horas e horas a desenvolvê-lo (eu espero que ninguém leia aqui um comentário depreciativo ou destrutivo, isto é mesmo assim e mesmo sistemas mais sofisticados podem ser desenvolvidos em casa, eu estou a falar de uma forma genérica).

Portanto, não vamos pôr tudo no mesmo saco e foi por isso que escrevi "tendem" em vez de "vão"...

De qq das formas, o problema coloca-se na mesma em algum ponto e eventualmente, mesmo que desenvolvas um sistema sofisticado (e que não é previsível) não tens nenhuma garantia que algures uma ou várias empresas maiores, com maiores recursos tecnológicos e humanos e com melhor acesso a informação não esteja a desenvolver um sistema mais sofisticado ainda que vai impactar no meio onde vais negociar e afectar os teus resultados com uma abordagem similar.

Bem, isto é bastante complexo e abstracto q.b. convenhamos pelo que o mais importante é a ideia, o conceito.


E sublinho ainda que eu não estou a dizer que não é possível ganhar assim ou assado. Apenas que é mais difícil de umas formas do que outras, que há formas mais adequadas para nós e que podem ser menos adequadas para outros.

Por exemplo, tu (e quem diz tu diz outras pessoas) podes estar em melhores condições de desenvolver um bom sistema do que eu ou o meu vizinho da casa ao lado...
Bons Negócios,
Marco Antonio
Caldeirão de Bolsa

FLOP - Fundamental Laws Of Profit


1. Mais vale perder um ganho que ganhar uma perda, a menos que se cumpra a Segunda Lei.
2. A expectativa de ganho deve superar a expectativa de perda, onde a expectativa mede a
....amplitude média do ganho/perda contra a respectiva probabilidade.
3. A Primeira Lei não é mesmo necessária mas com Três Leis isto fica definitivamente mais giro.
Avatar do Utilizador
Administrador Fórum
 
Mensagens: 31693
Registado: 4/11/2002 22:16
Localização: Vilar do Paraíso

por cannot » 10/8/2009 0:28

MarcoAntonio Escreveu:
cannot Escreveu:Não sei até que ponto conheces os sistemas automáticos (...)


Estou relativamente familiarizado e sei que existe uma grande variedade de sistemas, incluindo sistemas desenvolvidos para se comportarem autonomamente em meios caóticos, algoritmos genéticos, redes neuronais e toda essa coisa (do que até já tenho umas luzes deste os tempos da faculdade, na cadeira de Inteligência Artificial). Nada disso é propriamente novo (aliás, uma das minhas colegas fez na altura um mestrado neste área, ainda eu ligava muito pouco aos mercados, por mera curiosidade).

(...)

Bem, isto é bastante complexo e abstracto q.b. convenhamos pelo que o mais importante é a ideia, o conceito.

Eu perguntei porque poderia estar a falar de coisas que não te dissessem nada mas pela tua resposta vejo que sabes do que falas (aliás como em todos os teus posts), e poderia até ter desenvolvido mais, mas este não será o local indicado.

A Int. artificial foi o início destas coisas (já não é nada de novo, tens razão, mas era sim muito baseada em regras e relações entre entidades) e até ainda se usam muitas das suas ideias. Depois, dentro da IA surgiu uma área, que se distanciou um pouco, chamada "machine learning", que usa métodos estatísticos de aprendizagem (o caso mais óbvio será o das redes neuronais mas existem muitos outros métodos e uma teoria matemática muito sólida que a sustenta) que tem tido um grande desenvolvimento nas últimas décadas. É ela que permite muitos dos sistemas chamados (na minha opinião erradamente) "inteligentes" que já existem e funcionam bem hoje em dia (ex: reconhecimento de caracteres, reconhecimento e síntese de fala, DNA sequencing, reconhecimento de pessoas com base na íris e impressões digitais, etc... ).

Está também a ser muito aplicada nos mercados financeiros.

Estamos a falar no abstracto e isto é uma coisa bastante complexa, claro. Quanto ao tempo que se demora a fazer criar um sistema destes posso dizer que pode demorar algum tempo principalmente porque (isto é a minha opinião, se falares com outras pessoas as opiniões podem ser diferentes) quem o constrói deve ter um bom conhecimento do problema que quer resolver - 1) como formular bem o problema, 2) quais as características que deve ter o sistema e 3) quais os dados mais importantes para resolver o problema.

Depois é correr o programa e fazer estatísticas para perceber se funciona ou não. Esta é a fase mais fácil, poderá ser mudar um parâmetro ou outro mas (isto é minha opinião) acho que o essencial é desenvolver um método que tenha as características adaptadas ao problema e isto não se pode fazer se não se perceber bem o problema.

Encontro muita gente a resolver problemas sem os perceber e a experimentar métodos às "escuras" e depois claro a parte difícil passa para o final - é o tuning do sistema. Essa na minha opinião é a maneira errada (mas parecerá mais simples) de o fazer e depois perde-se tempos "infinitos" às voltas com os parâmetros para melhorar o que deveria, no fundo, aprender sozinho.

Eu estou a aplicar estas coisas à bolsa como um hobby, como disse faço isto no meu trabalho, e não desenvolvo os sistemas especificamente para a bolsa. Apenas adapto os que faço a este novo problema. De qualquer forma não espero ter nada a funcionar dentro no próximo ano, até lá estou a ganhar experiência a dar à manivela e a aprender a analisar acções, muito com a vossa ajuda. Daqui vou tirando os factores que julgar mais importantes e depois é garantir que o sistema também dispões deles para poder aprender qqr coisa de jeito :mrgreen:

Abraço
"Every solution breeds new problems." Murphy's Law
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 1279
Registado: 15/1/2009 15:28
Localização: Earth

por arnie » 10/8/2009 6:38

Acreditando que os sistemas automaticos/mecanicos baseam-se todos nos mesmos valores ,OHLCV, eles acabam por deixar um rasto de "padrões" de barras/preços que com o passar do tempo começam a ser identificados pelos milhões de traders de todo o mundo.

Detectando tais padrões podemos tentar "aproveitar a boleia dos mesmos" e retirar algumas mais valias.

Ninguém pense que vai voltar a inventar a roda. Tudo o que havia para ser inventado já o foi.
A unica coisa que resta neste momento é o remisturar as ideias e tentar encontrar algo que ainda resulte.

Seja qual o sistema que for, o mercado encarrega-se de o ir anulando. Tal como eu disse, humanos e maquinas vão deixando um rasto que com o tempo começa a ser detectado e a partir desse ponto, o mercado, "nós", fazemos o resto, anulamo-nos a nós proprios.

Nós vivemos numa especie de loop. Sempre a repetir os mesmos padrões, daí ser natural que um sistema gerido por IA conseguir obter bons resultados quando comparado com traders. No entanto, também eles, com o tempo, deixam um rasto de padrões que começam a ser detectados.

O segredo não está em ir à frente da manada mas sim atrás desta :idea:
Bons negocios,
arnie
 
Mensagens: 3094
Registado: 4/11/2002 23:09
Localização: Viras à esq, segues em frente, viras à dir, segues em frente e viras novamente à dir. CHEGASTE

por cannot » 10/8/2009 9:09

arnie Escreveu:Ninguém pense que vai voltar a inventar a roda. Tudo o que havia para ser inventado já o foi.

(...)

O segredo não está em ir à frente da manada mas sim atrás desta :idea:


Quanto a tudo já ter sido inventado estás completamente errado! Digo isto com grande convicção, e até te digo que é exactamente o contrário, quase nada foi ainda inventado.

Eu não tenho mesmo opinião que a única maneira é fazer como todos os outros, e de novo penso o contrário. Se assim fosse a economia estagnaria, as mais valias estão sempre nas novas ideias.

Quanto aos padrões que os sistemas deixam. Claro que tudo segue qqr tipo de método, mas acho que não sabes o que se faz hoje em dia em termos de sistemas automáticos. Por exemplo, a bolsa é um excelente lugar para aplicar isto porque mal tomamos uma decisão sabemos se esta foi correcta ao errada (porque temos acesso ao valor da cotação) logo é muito óbvio que podemos (devemos ter um sistema que tenha esta característica) adaptar os nossos parâmetros ao que aconteceu. No fundo o sistema está a aprender e a ir com a manada, mas numa forma diferente da que tu dizes.

Eu tenho que voltar a dizer que as coisas existem para ser alteradas pois o conhecimento que temos delas é em grande parte errado. Acredita que daqui a uns anos a bolsa de valores vai ser completamente diferente do que tu tens hoje.

Outra razão para querer sistemas automáticos é para não perder o meu tempo a olhar para um gráfico em movimento enquanto posso contribuir com algo produtivo para a sociedade. Desculpem o meu sarcasmo mas quanto me dizem que algo não se pode fazer (é impossível) ou temos que fazer como a maior parte das pessoas, ou como se faz à tantos anos, fico de cabelos em pé.

Abraço
"Every solution breeds new problems." Murphy's Law
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 1279
Registado: 15/1/2009 15:28
Localização: Earth

por masterpro » 10/8/2009 9:38

Adrox Escreveu:
JRTRADER Escreveu:Penso que quem observa diariamente os movimentos efectuados ao minuto, apercebe-se que, ao contrário do que muitos tentam transmitir, há claramente manipulação das cotações, seja essa efectuada por grandes traders ou institucionais, mas a realidade é que existe e por vezes é mesmo óbvio...

Se as manipulações são assim tao faceis de descobrir e de identificar para ti, presumo que também seja muito facil para ti acompanhar as manipulações e ganhar montes de dinheiro, não??

Ou é mais ao contrário, sempre que perdes dinheiro é pk da manipulação??


Acredita que se eu visse manipulações todos os dias, mantinha-me bem caladinho, e limitava-me a segui-las e a ganhar dinheiro...


Cumprimentos.[/b]



Quem segue ao minuto no nasdaq e NYSQ, dá claramente para ver isso, agora saberes a intenção, se desse para saber já eu o JRTRADER e muitos outros eramos ricos não achas?


Milhares de ordens de 100 acções , isto falando em acções com valores de 1, 2, 3 e 4 dollars, estas servem para avaliar até onde os investidores vão, e eu já vi isso no PSI20 também, e já o tinha dito á uns anitos atrás, embora numa escala muito diminuta mas já vi.



8-) 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-) 8-)
 
Mensagens: 671
Registado: 13/3/2007 14:42
Localização: 17

por nunoand99 » 10/8/2009 10:25

Parece-me que estamos aqui a confundir dois tópicos distintos!

Um prende-se com a evolução da tecnologia, e como a mesma, no seu inicio, normalmente está restrito a um pequeno grupo de pessoas...

isto é óptimo, e é o que faz o mundo evoluir (do meu ponto de vista). Quantos em na década de 70 se podem orgulhar de ordens "stop"? E sequências "truncadas" de ordens? E utilização de lógicas do género IF..THEN?

Bom, hoje as mesmas estão completamente massificadas...

E nem vale a pena entrar em ordem de conta com o acesso a certos instrumentos financeiros, há muito existentes para as casas de investimento, e somente recentemente disponiveis para o comum dos mortais.


Por outro lado, aborda-se aqui um outro tema, esse sim mais problemático, que se prende com o que descreveram de o sistema "comer" o "excedente do consumidor", entenda-se a margem entre o preço de cotação e o preço que o consumidor estava disposto a pagar!

Tal questão só se poderá colocar por falta de concorrência (que com a crise se vai tornar mais gritante) a nivel de quem possui esses sistemas!

E não se esqueçam da fusão entre praças bolsistas que também tem andado na moda!

Assunto, a ser verdade, que em breve, estou certo, merecerá a atenção dos reguladores.
 
Mensagens: 915
Registado: 16/5/2005 21:38

por LTCM » 10/8/2009 22:40

What's Behind High-Frequency Trading

By SCOTT PATTERSON and GEOFFREY ROGOW

High-frequency trading, long an obscure corner of the market, has leapt into the spotlight this year. Wildly successful in 2008, high-frequency traders are the talk of Wall Street, attracting big bucks and some unwanted attention. Concerns that some traders are taking advantage of less fleet-footed investors has drawn the attention of regulators and members of Congress. The following is an explanation of the core issues, based on interviews with industry participants and regulators.

Q: What is high-frequency trading?

A: Definitions differ, but at its most basic, high-frequency trading implies speed: Using supercomputers, firms make trades in a matter of microseconds, or one-millionth of a second. Goals vary. Some trading firms try to catch fleeting moves in everything from stocks to currencies to commodities. They hunt for "signals," such as the movement of interest rates, that indicate which way parts of the market may move in short periods. Some try to find ways to take advantage of subtle quirks in the infrastructure of trading.

Other firms are "market makers," providing securities on each side of a buy and sell order. Some firms trade on signals and make markets.

Q: How do players make money in high-frequency trades?

A: Many high-frequency traders collect tiny gains, often measured in pennies, on short-term market gyrations. They hunt for temporary "inefficiencies" in the market and trade in ways that can make them money before the brief distortions go away.
[High-Frequency Trading]

Market-making, high-frequency firms hope to make money on the difference between how much investors are willing to buy and sell a stock, or the "bid-ask spread." They do this by selling and buying on both sides of the trade. Many exchanges offer "rebates" of about one-third of a penny a share to outfits that are willing to step up and provide shares when needed.

Q: Who are the big players in high frequency?

A: They range from well- to lesser-known firms. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Chicago hedge fund Citadel Investment Group LLC have high-frequency operations. An innovator in superfast trading strategies is hedge-fund firm Renaissance Technologies LLC.

Privately held Getco LLC, a Chicago high-frequency firm founded in 1999, is a registered market maker with operations in markets around the world. Other high-frequency outfits include firms such as Jane Street Capital LLC, Hudson River Trading LLC, Wolverine Trading LLC and Jump Trading LLC.

Q: Why is everyone talking about high-frequency trading?

A: In the trading community, high-frequency has drawn interest because it was a wildly successful strategy last year. More recently, it made headlines when a former Goldman Sachs employee was charged by federal prosecutors with stealing trade secrets from the firm's high-frequency platform.

Also grabbing attention are the volume numbers. High-frequency trading now accounts for more than half of all stock-trading volume in the U.S. It also generates more revenue for exchanges. NYSE Euronext, owner of the New York Stock Exchange, is building a data center to cater to high-speed traders.

Q: What are "flash orders," and what is the controversy surrounding them?

A: Typically on trades, exchanges pay rebates to traders who post shares to buy or sell and charge fees to traders who respond to those offers. This setup creates an incentive to earn rebates. That is one place where flash orders come in.

With a flash order, a trading firm can keep its order on a certain exchange for up to half a second without matching an existing buy or sell order on another exchange, a move that puts it in a position of poster, rather than responder. The hope is that another trader who needs to buy or sell quickly steps in on the other side of the trade. This dynamic boosts the chance the flash-order trader will complete the trade on the exchange and get the rebate. Exchanges offer flash orders to keep market share.

Regulators worry that certain unscrupulous participants in the market with ultrafast computer technology could game these orders, trading ahead of them and affecting the price of the security.

Q: Who will be hurt if flash orders are banned?

A: A ban on flash orders, under consideration by the Securities and Exchange Commission, could hurt the profits of high-frequency traders who use flash extensively. Some flash-order advocates said a ban could cause trading volume to drop on the exchanges as traders look for better execution in alternative, less-transparent venues.

Q: What is "naked access," and why the controversy around it?

A: Many brokers allow high-frequency outfits to trade directly on an exchange using a broker's computer-access code. Most brokers closely monitor the activity, but some allow the traders to interact with the exchange largely unchecked, according to regulators such as the SEC. In the industry, this is known as "naked access." Critics worry that a rogue firm's system could destabilize parts of the market, even leading to a broad-based market selloff, without proper oversight and risk controls.

Q: How does it impact mom-and-pop investors?

A: Proponents said high-frequency provides a constant, ever-ready flow of securities when investors need them, making trading cheaper for everyone. When a mutual fund wants to buy 10,000 shares of Google Inc., odds are a high-frequency shop will be ready to provide the shares.

Critics worry that traders could use quick-draw capabilities to drive up prices, selling them back to investors at an inflated level. Another concern are rebates that exchanges pay to high-frequency traders, as the costs could be passed on to investors.

Q: Am I a high-frequency trader without realizing it?

A: Most online brokers that cater to individual investors and nearly all full-service brokers have servers at the stock-trading platforms to cut buying and selling speed down to milliseconds. This ensures orders are disposed of quickly and efficiently at high speeds. However, brokers generally don't use the highly sophisticated strategies plied by dedicated high-frequency traders, such as trading off of obscure signals in the market.
Remember the Golden Rule: Those who have the gold make the rules.
***
"A soberania e o respeito de Portugal impõem que neste lugar se erga um Forte, e isso é obra e serviço dos homens de El-Rei nosso senhor e, como tal, por mais duro, por mais difícil e por mais trabalhoso que isso dê, (...) é serviço de Portugal. E tem que se cumprir."
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 2982
Registado: 28/2/2007 14:18

por LTCM » 10/8/2009 22:55

arnie Escreveu:Acreditando que os sistemas automaticos/mecanicos baseam-se todos nos mesmos valores ,OHLCV, eles acabam por deixar um rasto de "padrões" de barras/preços que com o passar do tempo começam a ser identificados pelos milhões de traders de todo o mundo.

Detectando tais padrões podemos tentar "aproveitar a boleia dos mesmos" e retirar algumas mais valias.

Ninguém pense que vai voltar a inventar a roda. Tudo o que havia para ser inventado já o foi.
A unica coisa que resta neste momento é o remisturar as ideias e tentar encontrar algo que ainda resulte.

Seja qual o sistema que for, o mercado encarrega-se de o ir anulando. Tal como eu disse, humanos e maquinas vão deixando um rasto que com o tempo começa a ser detectado e a partir desse ponto, o mercado, "nós", fazemos o resto, anulamo-nos a nós proprios.

Nós vivemos numa especie de loop. Sempre a repetir os mesmos padrões, daí ser natural que um sistema gerido por IA conseguir obter bons resultados quando comparado com traders. No entanto, também eles, com o tempo, deixam um rasto de padrões que começam a ser detectados.

O segredo não está em ir à frente da manada mas sim atrás desta :idea:


No caso do HFT, que é o que aqui se está a discutir, não é isso que acontece porque:
Este tipo de algoritmos não obedece a regras, cria regras, como faria um trader que estivesse a observar order flow (só que de forma muito mais rápida).

As relações causa-efeito tradicionais (if then else) não se aplicam neste domínio, são problemas mais complexos.


Mais, se existe algum segredo, esse é ir sempre à frente da manada (front-running), por isso é que é uma prática proibida.
Remember the Golden Rule: Those who have the gold make the rules.
***
"A soberania e o respeito de Portugal impõem que neste lugar se erga um Forte, e isso é obra e serviço dos homens de El-Rei nosso senhor e, como tal, por mais duro, por mais difícil e por mais trabalhoso que isso dê, (...) é serviço de Portugal. E tem que se cumprir."
Avatar do Utilizador
 
Mensagens: 2982
Registado: 28/2/2007 14:18

Próximo

Quem está ligado:
Utilizadores a ver este Fórum: Bing [Bot], danielnlopes, Google Adsense [Bot], Google Feedfetcher, LoneWolf, pattern e 72 visitantes